Nokia 9 PureView initial review

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“Nokia 9” PureView initial review
It’s fair to say that the Nokia 9 has been the longest rumoured phone of the past few years.

Nokia 9 PureView initial review: Pursuing photographic perfection

  • It’s fair to say that the Nokia 9 Pure View has remained the longest rumored phone of the past few years.

  • But here we have it: the Nokia 9 PureView is real, it does have five cameras, and lining up against 2019 flagship devices.

  • There are five Sony sensors, all 12-megapixels with 1.25µm pixels, sitting behind Zeiss lenses.  

It’s fair to say that the Nokia 9 Pure View has been the highest rumored phone of the past few years. There are references to a Nokia 9 all the step back to 2017 and when those rumors started to include a five-camera system, things started to get a little unbelievable.

But here we have it: the Nokia 9 PureView is real, it does have five cameras, and lining up against 2019 flagship devices launching alongside
“Nokia 9” PureView is real, it does have five cameras, and lining up against 2019 flagship





But here we have it: the Nokia 9 PureView is real, it does have five cameras, and lining up against 2019 flagship devices launching alongside, it’s one of the most unique devices in the smartphone space.

HMD Global, it seems, doesn’t want to just follow the pack and add a wide-angle and zoom lens like everyone else, instead it’s returning to Nokia’s previous PureView aims – image quality.

Explaining that PureView camera

  • Five 12-megapixel 1.25µm Sony cameras
  • 3 monochrome sensors, 2 color sensors, Zeiss lenses
  • Time of flight sensor
  • The dynamic range of 12.3 stops
  • RAW processing

We’re going to dive straight into the camera because that’s what you want to know about, right? It’s a five-camera system developed in close collaboration with Light, who previously produced a 16-camera device, the L16. Qualcomm has also worked closely on the Nokia 9 PureView to ensure that the Snapdragon hardware can drive this camera, using the image signal processor to best effect.

There are five Sony sensors, all 12-megapixels with 1.25µm pixels, sitting behind Zeiss lenses. Three of these sensors capture monochrome and two capture RGB (color). The aim here is that the monochrome sensors capture all the light data full of detail and add that to the RGB data to create an image.




Having more lenses means it can use bracketing – taking simultaneous images at different exposure settings effectively – to get data that a normal camera wouldn’t. For example, you can have those monochrome sensors underexpose and overexpose respectively to capture detail from highlights or shadows that the other wouldn’t see.It’s a system with a huge dynamic range – 12.4 stops – with the aim of giving you lots of details whatever the scene. What’s more, Nokia is working with Adobe Lightroom for processing of the DNG RAW file it produces, so you can make tweaks on the device before the final JPEG is produced.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mw28Wi5UgRE